Tree Spokes-thingy (Dr Seuss' The Lorax reviewed)


"Unless someone cares an awful lot. Nothing's going to get better. It's not."

This was a late post, but nonetheless I'll share it.

Last last Saturday, I was treated to a 3D experience by my friend, Ate Chael. She works at the Climate Change Commission (CCC) which serves as the sole policy-making body of the government tasked to coordinate and monitor various plans, programs and policies of the Philippine government relating to climate change. Anyways, they tied up with SM Cinemas in promoting a movie adaptation of Dr. Seuss' classic tale Lorax. So on Saturday (which happened to be my birthday), I was with Ate Chael and Ate Fina (Ate Anna, Kuya Fids and Ginette would have come, but they have prior commitments so yun) at SM North EDSA's IMAx Theater. 

The animated film follows the story of Ted, a boy in search for a real tree to win the heart of the girl of his dreams, Audrey. As soon as he was out of the metal borders of Thneedville (their plastic village), the young boy learns the reason why their real, candy-colored trees called Trufullas became extinct. The story was narrated by the Onceler, the guy who invented the "thneed"-- a cloth-like material that can be used for just about anything.

So where's Lorax-- the guy who speaks for the trees?

He's in the tree stump. He emerged the moment Onceler axed the first tree he laid his eyes upon. Lorax warned Onceler of the repercussions of continuously cutting trees but the human being did the deed until one last tree is left. It was eventually cut by Onceler's mom. Many more years would pass and the people of Thneedville are in need of fresh air, so an ambitious little man (yes, he is literally little) developed bottled air. Because demand is great he became the town's tycoon and some sorta savior. Lorax vanished and nobody cares to bring back real trees because they're suspended in the belief that their bottled air would suffice. So Ted sets on a journey to find the Onceler and a real tree, with Grammy egging him, at first to impress Audrey and eventually to start something good and plant something better.

Contrary to what other critics believe, I think the movie is interesting and nice. While pundits decry that it has a preachy care-for-the-environment message or that the Dr Seuss' simple tale is oversimplified, I believe otherwise. The movie, while it targets a younger audience, might as well reach a higher age demographic because of its all encompassing message. While the concepts of stewardship and contentment subtly entrenched in the movie may be too big for children to understand, the movie succeeds in breaking it into bite-size pieces. The beautifully- drawn animations, their jumpy musical numbers and the great voice talents behind the characters made it light and interesting for kids and those kids at heart.

I haven't read the book and I'm actually looking for it. Despite being unable to do so, I think the movie itself is able to deliver what Dr Seuss' message is-- going overboard would always result to bad things which people would regret in the end. The Onceler learned his lesson the hard way. He may have been given a second chance because of his grave mistake but we are taught that we should also listen to elders when they tell us that what we're doing is wrong. The Lorax never failed in telling Onceler that cutting too many trees would be bad not just for the forest but also for human beings but he wouldn't budge and listen. The same goes with us, whether we're talking of taking care of our environment or other aspects in our lives.

We should not wait for the orange thingy to come out of our tree stumps for us to be responsible loggers. The Philippines has too much to offer and because we live here, we're given the chief responsibility to take care of our patrimony. Our politicians may launch hundreds of environmental advocacies or greening programs but the rest is left upon us to continue planting trees and taking care of them. The people of Thneedville did not know the value of trees not until Ted showed them a seed and asked them to help him let that seed grow. We shouldn't wait until the last Narra or Acacia falls or when another natural disaster hits us before we finally wake up and heed this call. Right now, we're constantly asked to take care of our environment. Let's move and let our actions speak our love for our ailing Inang Kalikasan. Cheesy but true. :D

5 out of 5 stars

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felix felicis: Tree Spokes-thingy (Dr Seuss' The Lorax reviewed)

Monday, March 26, 2012

Tree Spokes-thingy (Dr Seuss' The Lorax reviewed)


"Unless someone cares an awful lot. Nothing's going to get better. It's not."

This was a late post, but nonetheless I'll share it.

Last last Saturday, I was treated to a 3D experience by my friend, Ate Chael. She works at the Climate Change Commission (CCC) which serves as the sole policy-making body of the government tasked to coordinate and monitor various plans, programs and policies of the Philippine government relating to climate change. Anyways, they tied up with SM Cinemas in promoting a movie adaptation of Dr. Seuss' classic tale Lorax. So on Saturday (which happened to be my birthday), I was with Ate Chael and Ate Fina (Ate Anna, Kuya Fids and Ginette would have come, but they have prior commitments so yun) at SM North EDSA's IMAx Theater. 

The animated film follows the story of Ted, a boy in search for a real tree to win the heart of the girl of his dreams, Audrey. As soon as he was out of the metal borders of Thneedville (their plastic village), the young boy learns the reason why their real, candy-colored trees called Trufullas became extinct. The story was narrated by the Onceler, the guy who invented the "thneed"-- a cloth-like material that can be used for just about anything.

So where's Lorax-- the guy who speaks for the trees?

He's in the tree stump. He emerged the moment Onceler axed the first tree he laid his eyes upon. Lorax warned Onceler of the repercussions of continuously cutting trees but the human being did the deed until one last tree is left. It was eventually cut by Onceler's mom. Many more years would pass and the people of Thneedville are in need of fresh air, so an ambitious little man (yes, he is literally little) developed bottled air. Because demand is great he became the town's tycoon and some sorta savior. Lorax vanished and nobody cares to bring back real trees because they're suspended in the belief that their bottled air would suffice. So Ted sets on a journey to find the Onceler and a real tree, with Grammy egging him, at first to impress Audrey and eventually to start something good and plant something better.

Contrary to what other critics believe, I think the movie is interesting and nice. While pundits decry that it has a preachy care-for-the-environment message or that the Dr Seuss' simple tale is oversimplified, I believe otherwise. The movie, while it targets a younger audience, might as well reach a higher age demographic because of its all encompassing message. While the concepts of stewardship and contentment subtly entrenched in the movie may be too big for children to understand, the movie succeeds in breaking it into bite-size pieces. The beautifully- drawn animations, their jumpy musical numbers and the great voice talents behind the characters made it light and interesting for kids and those kids at heart.

I haven't read the book and I'm actually looking for it. Despite being unable to do so, I think the movie itself is able to deliver what Dr Seuss' message is-- going overboard would always result to bad things which people would regret in the end. The Onceler learned his lesson the hard way. He may have been given a second chance because of his grave mistake but we are taught that we should also listen to elders when they tell us that what we're doing is wrong. The Lorax never failed in telling Onceler that cutting too many trees would be bad not just for the forest but also for human beings but he wouldn't budge and listen. The same goes with us, whether we're talking of taking care of our environment or other aspects in our lives.

We should not wait for the orange thingy to come out of our tree stumps for us to be responsible loggers. The Philippines has too much to offer and because we live here, we're given the chief responsibility to take care of our patrimony. Our politicians may launch hundreds of environmental advocacies or greening programs but the rest is left upon us to continue planting trees and taking care of them. The people of Thneedville did not know the value of trees not until Ted showed them a seed and asked them to help him let that seed grow. We shouldn't wait until the last Narra or Acacia falls or when another natural disaster hits us before we finally wake up and heed this call. Right now, we're constantly asked to take care of our environment. Let's move and let our actions speak our love for our ailing Inang Kalikasan. Cheesy but true. :D

5 out of 5 stars

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