Why Mr Clavio's comments weren't racist

Yesterday, veteran journalist Arnold Clavio (of GMANews) drew flak mostly from Azkals fan after his straightforward comment that the most of the members of the National Football Team are "nagpapanggap na kayumanggi" (prentending to be Filipino). The comment, heard on national television, was made after Unang Hirit journalists were discussing the recent victory reaped by the Azkals against Tajikistan. A few more hours and Mr Clavio's name would be one of the country's top trending topic in the popular social networking site, Twitter. Netizens have mixed feedback on the infamous remark, some admired the journalist's courage to speak like that but many other fans of the football team raged against Mr Clavio.

Here's a video clip of what Mr Clavio said on national TV:

So what do I think?

First off, I do think Mr Clavio's comments are not at all racist. The words used may have been very strong ("Hindi naman kayo Filipino. Nagpapanggap lang kayong kayumanggi. Hindi kayo dito lumaki. Mahirap yun. Insensitive."), but I'd like to believe that Mr Clavio would have wanted to convey a stronger message across. Looking back, the comment was not made because Mr Clavio was annoyed by these good looking men or just because he had wanted to. The retort was said because he did not like the way these athlethes treated women-- the recent sexual harassment case filed by former Philippine Olympic Committee President, Ms Cristy Ramos. If we would listen closely to the whole discussion, he was particularly mad at the fact that just because these men possess charm and are perceived to be socially higher- beings (i.e. they are Filipinos with foreign blood) they can do whatever they want to women or they can easily tamper on their dignities. Granting that such a remark made by the Azkals may be taken lightly by women from Western countries, it still doesn't make an excuse to say that to Filipinas. The fact that they weren't raised here by their parents provides a legroom for cultural and gender respect-- they are not much familiar with our norms and our conservative streak so comments like that must not be said offhandedly. Add to that the fact that they are talking to an authority.

But secondly, I do believe that the Filipino spirit goes beyond borders; it transgresses the lines of skin colors, language and roots. As long as you say in your heart that you are a Filipino and that you accomplish feats to bring glory to our nation, then you are one. But then again, being a Filipino takes into heart the long standing traditions of respect and humility. As argued, the Azkals were quick to skip that fact-- as soon as they rose to fame, so did the sexual harrassment complaints against them.

I congratulate the Azkals on their recent victory against Tajikistan and the new mark in Philippine football history they have made. It is exciting to know that they have come this far and has progressed despite their underdog status. However, as Sen Pia Cayetano have said, such foul behavior must not go unpunished. These players, if they really are Filipinos, must learn how to respect their fellowmen. They hold an authoritative status in our society-- they are considered as representatives, ambassadors to the sports world. An attitude deeming of a Filipino gentleman is expected from them.

Mr Clavio's comment on them being "mapagpanggap na Filipino" is understandable. Until they give the respect Filipinas deserve, then they're good as foreigners in their own land. The same way we treat those who slur our race and those who make fun of our intelligence. We can still be proud of their feat. But we will be prouder if they put to heart the Filipino spirit of respect to women.

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felix felicis: Why Mr Clavio's comments weren't racist

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Why Mr Clavio's comments weren't racist

Yesterday, veteran journalist Arnold Clavio (of GMANews) drew flak mostly from Azkals fan after his straightforward comment that the most of the members of the National Football Team are "nagpapanggap na kayumanggi" (prentending to be Filipino). The comment, heard on national television, was made after Unang Hirit journalists were discussing the recent victory reaped by the Azkals against Tajikistan. A few more hours and Mr Clavio's name would be one of the country's top trending topic in the popular social networking site, Twitter. Netizens have mixed feedback on the infamous remark, some admired the journalist's courage to speak like that but many other fans of the football team raged against Mr Clavio.

Here's a video clip of what Mr Clavio said on national TV:

So what do I think?

First off, I do think Mr Clavio's comments are not at all racist. The words used may have been very strong ("Hindi naman kayo Filipino. Nagpapanggap lang kayong kayumanggi. Hindi kayo dito lumaki. Mahirap yun. Insensitive."), but I'd like to believe that Mr Clavio would have wanted to convey a stronger message across. Looking back, the comment was not made because Mr Clavio was annoyed by these good looking men or just because he had wanted to. The retort was said because he did not like the way these athlethes treated women-- the recent sexual harassment case filed by former Philippine Olympic Committee President, Ms Cristy Ramos. If we would listen closely to the whole discussion, he was particularly mad at the fact that just because these men possess charm and are perceived to be socially higher- beings (i.e. they are Filipinos with foreign blood) they can do whatever they want to women or they can easily tamper on their dignities. Granting that such a remark made by the Azkals may be taken lightly by women from Western countries, it still doesn't make an excuse to say that to Filipinas. The fact that they weren't raised here by their parents provides a legroom for cultural and gender respect-- they are not much familiar with our norms and our conservative streak so comments like that must not be said offhandedly. Add to that the fact that they are talking to an authority.

But secondly, I do believe that the Filipino spirit goes beyond borders; it transgresses the lines of skin colors, language and roots. As long as you say in your heart that you are a Filipino and that you accomplish feats to bring glory to our nation, then you are one. But then again, being a Filipino takes into heart the long standing traditions of respect and humility. As argued, the Azkals were quick to skip that fact-- as soon as they rose to fame, so did the sexual harrassment complaints against them.

I congratulate the Azkals on their recent victory against Tajikistan and the new mark in Philippine football history they have made. It is exciting to know that they have come this far and has progressed despite their underdog status. However, as Sen Pia Cayetano have said, such foul behavior must not go unpunished. These players, if they really are Filipinos, must learn how to respect their fellowmen. They hold an authoritative status in our society-- they are considered as representatives, ambassadors to the sports world. An attitude deeming of a Filipino gentleman is expected from them.

Mr Clavio's comment on them being "mapagpanggap na Filipino" is understandable. Until they give the respect Filipinas deserve, then they're good as foreigners in their own land. The same way we treat those who slur our race and those who make fun of our intelligence. We can still be proud of their feat. But we will be prouder if they put to heart the Filipino spirit of respect to women.

Labels: , , ,

1 Comments:

At March 17, 2012 at 1:51 AM , Blogger Jackie Paulino said...

HAPPY BIRTHDAY! :)

 

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