Momentary Escapes


“’Di na babalik ang pagtingin, ‘di nagwawala ang damdamin.”

(Grabbed from Myx's Page)
I was looking for some sort of an escape that day. Something that would release the tensions I got after taking an aptitude exam as part of my Master studies application and from learning that my planned trip to Bangkok may possibly be botched. I chose to catch the limited screening of one of Cinemalaya’s offerings this year, Marie Jamora’s Ang Nawawala (What Isn’t There). It was actually a choice between Bwakaw which starred Eddie Garcia and Ang Nawawala. I dunno why I chose the latter, maybe because I was curious of the buzz it got during Cinemalaya’s run. Whatever that reason maybe, I think it was a good choice to watch this not-your-cliché- love story.

In Ang Nawawala, we meet Gibson Bonifacio (Dominic Roco). He closes his eyes when he listens to good music and he always slings his handy camera on his neck just to capture every other moment he feels like keeping. He comes home this Christmas to spend it with his family. Amidst the cheery mood the yuletide season imbibes, there’s a certain cloud of gloom that envelops Gibson’s family, something that the flashbacks, interjected in between scenes, try to tell us. Aside from his family’s gloom, Gibson also has his own peculiarty—he doesn’t speak. His silent life would soon get a beat as his childhood friend, Teddy (Alchris Gacula) introduces him to a new set of friends, the lively local underground music scene and a possible relationship with the attractive Enid (Annicka Dolonius).

I thought that Jamora’s debut movie was a good one. It gives us a nice glimpse of how the local music scene is thriving despite the many commentaries that it is starting to die. No, we see them alive and kicking—independent from all the dictates of the mainstream media and that’s why we appreciate it. I admit I do not know almost all of the acts featured on the movie—those that I know, Hannah + Gabi, Ang Bandang Shirley, Pedicab and Ebe Dancel, I haven’t much listened to. But hey, I’m glad that the movie gave me an alternative list of local bands to listen to and a good soundtrack to look forward to.

Gibson (Dominic Roco) and Enid (Annicka Dolonius) sharing music
on a not so conventional way. Swweeeet. :)))
(Inquirer Entertainment Photo)
Again on the movie, while I felt that Gibson’s self-imposed silence is a selfish choice he made, I also felt that it is a necessary element of the story to help us understand the underlying message it tries to resonate. In a world where people communicate without really understanding everything, we find a common language that binds us all—music; something that is very much alive in every scene Jamora’s movie depicts. We see how each lyric and distinct melody gave voice to whatever musing Gibson has on his life and other matters of the heart. Every beat of the percussions, those light strums made by each guitar and those funky sounds produced by the synthesizers—we could all relate it to a certain feeling or mood we are experiencing. Like Gibson, we close our eyes and allow ourselves to get lost if only for a moment. And just like that, we find the courage to go back to real world and face everything head one. The same thing Gibson did on the final moments of the film—he talked. And those words he uttered were all he needed to be released from the shackles of heartbreak and tragic losses. Music gave him a place to hide. But it also gave him the courage to speak when it’s needed most.

4 out of 5 stars.

Reviews for Ang Nawawala:
We Talk Movies says the movie is great in alot of aspects
Spot.ph says the movie is heartfelt but nevercheesy

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felix felicis: Momentary Escapes

Sunday, September 23, 2012

Momentary Escapes


“’Di na babalik ang pagtingin, ‘di nagwawala ang damdamin.”

(Grabbed from Myx's Page)
I was looking for some sort of an escape that day. Something that would release the tensions I got after taking an aptitude exam as part of my Master studies application and from learning that my planned trip to Bangkok may possibly be botched. I chose to catch the limited screening of one of Cinemalaya’s offerings this year, Marie Jamora’s Ang Nawawala (What Isn’t There). It was actually a choice between Bwakaw which starred Eddie Garcia and Ang Nawawala. I dunno why I chose the latter, maybe because I was curious of the buzz it got during Cinemalaya’s run. Whatever that reason maybe, I think it was a good choice to watch this not-your-cliché- love story.

In Ang Nawawala, we meet Gibson Bonifacio (Dominic Roco). He closes his eyes when he listens to good music and he always slings his handy camera on his neck just to capture every other moment he feels like keeping. He comes home this Christmas to spend it with his family. Amidst the cheery mood the yuletide season imbibes, there’s a certain cloud of gloom that envelops Gibson’s family, something that the flashbacks, interjected in between scenes, try to tell us. Aside from his family’s gloom, Gibson also has his own peculiarty—he doesn’t speak. His silent life would soon get a beat as his childhood friend, Teddy (Alchris Gacula) introduces him to a new set of friends, the lively local underground music scene and a possible relationship with the attractive Enid (Annicka Dolonius).

I thought that Jamora’s debut movie was a good one. It gives us a nice glimpse of how the local music scene is thriving despite the many commentaries that it is starting to die. No, we see them alive and kicking—independent from all the dictates of the mainstream media and that’s why we appreciate it. I admit I do not know almost all of the acts featured on the movie—those that I know, Hannah + Gabi, Ang Bandang Shirley, Pedicab and Ebe Dancel, I haven’t much listened to. But hey, I’m glad that the movie gave me an alternative list of local bands to listen to and a good soundtrack to look forward to.

Gibson (Dominic Roco) and Enid (Annicka Dolonius) sharing music
on a not so conventional way. Swweeeet. :)))
(Inquirer Entertainment Photo)
Again on the movie, while I felt that Gibson’s self-imposed silence is a selfish choice he made, I also felt that it is a necessary element of the story to help us understand the underlying message it tries to resonate. In a world where people communicate without really understanding everything, we find a common language that binds us all—music; something that is very much alive in every scene Jamora’s movie depicts. We see how each lyric and distinct melody gave voice to whatever musing Gibson has on his life and other matters of the heart. Every beat of the percussions, those light strums made by each guitar and those funky sounds produced by the synthesizers—we could all relate it to a certain feeling or mood we are experiencing. Like Gibson, we close our eyes and allow ourselves to get lost if only for a moment. And just like that, we find the courage to go back to real world and face everything head one. The same thing Gibson did on the final moments of the film—he talked. And those words he uttered were all he needed to be released from the shackles of heartbreak and tragic losses. Music gave him a place to hide. But it also gave him the courage to speak when it’s needed most.

4 out of 5 stars.

Reviews for Ang Nawawala:

Labels: , , , , , , , , ,

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