Temple Hopping inside the Grand Palace Complex


That's me excited to ride their Skytrain. 
Armed with our foldable city maps and renewed energy even after a sleep-deprived night at the airport, my friends and I went straight to Udee Bangkok—our dorm for our four-day stay at the Thai capital. Since the check-in time is still 2PM, we just asked the owners if we could leave our luggage at their storage room until the check-in time and go on to our first destination. The owners gladly allowed us to do so. And then we’re off. With the same clothes we wore the night before. Yes, we ditched taking a bath because we thought we’ll still be okay.

When we got out, the sun literally gave us a warm welcome. Hello, Bangkok heat. Despite the first signs of sweat and greasy hair, Team Bangkok still carried on. Keber. Good thing, the bus we rode was airconditioned.

Commuter tip: The main modes of transportation in Bangkok are their public utility buses, tuktuks (it’s a cross between our jeepney and a tryke), cabs and scooters. They also have the MRT and the Skytrain system for more convenient rides. Tuktuks in the metro are overly priced (might be because we’re tourists) so I suggest that you take the buses as much as possible. If you can’t read Thai, don’t fret. Their buses have number codes based on the routes that they take so you won’t really get lost, not unless if you fall asleep. We haven’t tried riding their scooters so I don’t know how those work. Cabs are advisable if you’re going home late or if the place you are going to is a bit far from the place you are staying. Some cab drivers speak and understand English (commonly used conversational statements) while a good number are not that able to do so. Just make sure that the meter is working. It would also be good to just write down the address of the place you are staying instead of dictating it to them; the risks of getting lost are minimized. :D

Khao San Road. While we're looking for breakfast.
So there, we rode Bus Number 524 and got down at Khao San Road to look for breakfast. We could have opted for a fastfood like McDo, but when we saw their food prices (inflated ng bongga, hahaha), we backed out. Across the street we found a diner that has a pretty appetizing menu. We sat down and ordered a platter of banana pancakes, 3 American Breakfast plates and 2 servings of sandwiches. There’s free coffee or tea that accompanied each meal. In order to enjoy the food, we decided to split it to six and began eating our hearty breakfast. In the background, their television was airing their early morning talkshow. There was this guy that impersonates Lady Gaga and was totally funny. Hahaha. What a great way to start our day.



Inside the Complex. Told you, the ~guards are giants.

After our breakfast, we looked for a ride going to the Grand Palace Complex. An ~extra friendly taxi driver was offering us a ride—for 150B (each of us), he’ll take us to a lot of temples and a floating market. We refused his offer because we felt that we could go to those temples and floating market without spending that much. He told us he’s a huge fan of Pacman—as if that would change our mind. Anyways, we walked towards the direction buses usually ply. I think we rode Bus Number 4 to get to the Grand Palace Complex.

It was a little before lunch when we entered the complex. Because the sun was shining so bright that time and the fact that we were not able to take a quick shower before our Palace visit, we were totally stoked. Oily face alert! Hahaha. And yes, there are hundred more tourists visiting the temples along us. Wow. So there, after a few minutes lining up, we were greeted by giant dragon warriors by the entrance. Cameras started clicking again.

Bus ride!
Tourist Tip: Foreign tourists who are interested to see the Grand Palace would have to pay 400B. This includes a chance to visit the temples inside the complex (i.e. Temple of the Emerald Buddha and the _____), the Royal Money Museum right beside the GPComplex ticket booth and the Vimanmek Mansion, which is a few blocks away from the complex. We suggest you take a cab (40B meter rate) going there since buses do not ply that route. Also, make sure you are not wearing shorts, sleeveless shirts and open-toed footwear because these are not allowed inside the temples. They would ask you to buy their malong/ loose trousers which cost 100-200B. To avoid shedding precious Baht intended for pasalubong and to avoid any hassle on your part, I suggest you wear pants and sleeved shirts and closed shoes (rubber shoes are good enough) when visiting these places. The only consolation is that the malongs sold have beautiful designs so keri lang din naman. Hahaha. Finally, tourists are not allowed to take pictures inside the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, the Royal Money Museum and the Vimanmek Mansion.

We postponed going to the Vimanmek Mansion until our last day because we’re really tired. By 1.30PM we’re done visiting the temples inside the Complex and the money museum. We had a lot of fun visiting these temples—that’s very much evident in the pictures. Keber sa oily at pawisang muka! Hahaha.

For more Bangkok photos, you may check my photoblog: www.kyemeruth.jux.com


Also, read my other posts on our Bangkok trip here and here.



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felix felicis: Temple Hopping inside the Grand Palace Complex

Monday, October 29, 2012

Temple Hopping inside the Grand Palace Complex


That's me excited to ride their Skytrain. 
Armed with our foldable city maps and renewed energy even after a sleep-deprived night at the airport, my friends and I went straight to Udee Bangkok—our dorm for our four-day stay at the Thai capital. Since the check-in time is still 2PM, we just asked the owners if we could leave our luggage at their storage room until the check-in time and go on to our first destination. The owners gladly allowed us to do so. And then we’re off. With the same clothes we wore the night before. Yes, we ditched taking a bath because we thought we’ll still be okay.

When we got out, the sun literally gave us a warm welcome. Hello, Bangkok heat. Despite the first signs of sweat and greasy hair, Team Bangkok still carried on. Keber. Good thing, the bus we rode was airconditioned.

Commuter tip: The main modes of transportation in Bangkok are their public utility buses, tuktuks (it’s a cross between our jeepney and a tryke), cabs and scooters. They also have the MRT and the Skytrain system for more convenient rides. Tuktuks in the metro are overly priced (might be because we’re tourists) so I suggest that you take the buses as much as possible. If you can’t read Thai, don’t fret. Their buses have number codes based on the routes that they take so you won’t really get lost, not unless if you fall asleep. We haven’t tried riding their scooters so I don’t know how those work. Cabs are advisable if you’re going home late or if the place you are going to is a bit far from the place you are staying. Some cab drivers speak and understand English (commonly used conversational statements) while a good number are not that able to do so. Just make sure that the meter is working. It would also be good to just write down the address of the place you are staying instead of dictating it to them; the risks of getting lost are minimized. :D

Khao San Road. While we're looking for breakfast.
So there, we rode Bus Number 524 and got down at Khao San Road to look for breakfast. We could have opted for a fastfood like McDo, but when we saw their food prices (inflated ng bongga, hahaha), we backed out. Across the street we found a diner that has a pretty appetizing menu. We sat down and ordered a platter of banana pancakes, 3 American Breakfast plates and 2 servings of sandwiches. There’s free coffee or tea that accompanied each meal. In order to enjoy the food, we decided to split it to six and began eating our hearty breakfast. In the background, their television was airing their early morning talkshow. There was this guy that impersonates Lady Gaga and was totally funny. Hahaha. What a great way to start our day.



Inside the Complex. Told you, the ~guards are giants.

After our breakfast, we looked for a ride going to the Grand Palace Complex. An ~extra friendly taxi driver was offering us a ride—for 150B (each of us), he’ll take us to a lot of temples and a floating market. We refused his offer because we felt that we could go to those temples and floating market without spending that much. He told us he’s a huge fan of Pacman—as if that would change our mind. Anyways, we walked towards the direction buses usually ply. I think we rode Bus Number 4 to get to the Grand Palace Complex.

It was a little before lunch when we entered the complex. Because the sun was shining so bright that time and the fact that we were not able to take a quick shower before our Palace visit, we were totally stoked. Oily face alert! Hahaha. And yes, there are hundred more tourists visiting the temples along us. Wow. So there, after a few minutes lining up, we were greeted by giant dragon warriors by the entrance. Cameras started clicking again.

Bus ride!
Tourist Tip: Foreign tourists who are interested to see the Grand Palace would have to pay 400B. This includes a chance to visit the temples inside the complex (i.e. Temple of the Emerald Buddha and the _____), the Royal Money Museum right beside the GPComplex ticket booth and the Vimanmek Mansion, which is a few blocks away from the complex. We suggest you take a cab (40B meter rate) going there since buses do not ply that route. Also, make sure you are not wearing shorts, sleeveless shirts and open-toed footwear because these are not allowed inside the temples. They would ask you to buy their malong/ loose trousers which cost 100-200B. To avoid shedding precious Baht intended for pasalubong and to avoid any hassle on your part, I suggest you wear pants and sleeved shirts and closed shoes (rubber shoes are good enough) when visiting these places. The only consolation is that the malongs sold have beautiful designs so keri lang din naman. Hahaha. Finally, tourists are not allowed to take pictures inside the Temple of the Emerald Buddha, the Royal Money Museum and the Vimanmek Mansion.

We postponed going to the Vimanmek Mansion until our last day because we’re really tired. By 1.30PM we’re done visiting the temples inside the Complex and the money museum. We had a lot of fun visiting these temples—that’s very much evident in the pictures. Keber sa oily at pawisang muka! Hahaha.

For more Bangkok photos, you may check my photoblog: www.kyemeruth.jux.com


Also, read my other posts on our Bangkok trip here and here.



Labels: , , , , , , , ,

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