Why Employees Leave Work?


A debater posted something about why employees leave their work and I thought it would be nice to share it everyone so I reposted it in my Facebook status. I also felt the need to elaborate and reflect on it so I’m reposting it yet again here in my blog. Here’s what I read:

It came up with this surprising finding: if you're losing good people, look to their immediate supervisor. More than any other single reason, he is the reason people stay and thrive in an organization. And he's the reason why they quit, taking their knowledge, experience and contacts with them. Often, straight to the competition.

“People leave managers not companies,” write the authors Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman. “So much money has been thrown at the challenge of keeping good people—in the form of better pay, better perks and better training—when, in the end, turnover is mostly a manager issue.” If you have a turnover problem, look first to your manager and supervisors.

Beyond a point, an employee’s primary need has less to do with money and more to do with how he’s treated and how valued he feels. Much of this depends directly on the immediate manager.

David W. Richards

While reflecting on that passage I read, I remember how the family usually spend dinner time by asking about what happened to each other’s days. I remembered how my mother talks about her day’s work inside the house and the movies she was able to watch within the day; Father on his Bible study groups and students at the Bible College he’s teaching in; my brothers and sister about school and rides home while I tell them things I learned from work and new stories I got from officemates. Most of the time, I share funny things that happened during work hours or topics we discussed during meetings. And then sometimes, I end up ranting over things that are beyond my control—a project that got sidelined because of tardiness, position papers that got watered down because of several political accommodations, attitude clashes between powers-that-be that affect the whole working environment and many more. I told my parents that felt like this shouldn’t be the case especially if the organization’s goal is for development and better governance. Then they told me that this is something that is very much common in workplaces. There’s office politics and people who relish bad mouthing other people or spreading rumors and bad vibes just when they feel like to. On one hand, my mother advised me to stay away from such people or if they cannot be avoided because we are a small organization, limit mingling with them lest I become a bearer of bad vibes too. On the other, my father told me to just do my job the best way that I can and deliver what is expected of me. After all, I came there to work and hone my skills. Relationships cultivated inside the workplace, while necessary, is still secondary to work productivity. He also told me that I should choose the people I trust carefully, hence the me-sessions group. Hehe.

Anyways, I know I shouldn’t be saying these things and that I promised myself that this should be a happy blog—free from the perversions of the world outside, but I feel that I just had to share these to everyone. I wouldn’t elaborate on the flaws I see inside our organization because that is something to be first, internal and confidential, but second, it is unethical to do so.

Mr. Richards is right when he said that “Beyond a point, an employee’s primary need has less to do with money and more to do with how he’s treated and how valued he feels. Much of this depends directly on the immediate manager.” But I also think that the other half of this much also depends on the employee—our dispositions and outlooks in life and in work have a similar effect on us the same way our bosses or co-workers affect our outputs. While our bosses may be too grumpy, lazy, domineering or if he takes too much credit on good things you really did, an onus is still placed on us on how we will effectively deal with these. Do we take these situations seriously that we plot how to torture our bosses to death or do we take things lightly and pass it off as another ego-pumping streak for your boss? I dunno with you, but most of time I take these lightly. First, because it wouldn’t do me any good to sulk in the corner and keep all that anger inside me. The sinful thoughts of anger and “murder” I hatch would just make me sick. But second, because doing so would not make me any better than them. Stooping down to their levels and trying to deflate their egos and pride by crossing fires with them or talking behind their back would be an insult to my intelligence and integrity. Sure, I feel bad sometimes, getting sidelined and all, but well, who doesn’t? Coupling that with a lot of hard feelings would just make us guilty overtime. So, keber!

In a nutshell, I believe that it is of great importance that we find a leadership that would inspire us to do better and motivate us to achieve more than those we are doing right now. The problems we face inside are rooted with the way the whole team is led—the people who steer us should guide us to the right direction, “matuwid na landas” as the President reiterated. We’ve already taken steps towards contributing to local government development and nation-building; I think it is high time for us to push further the envelope and go beyond the usual and of course, leave all the politicking aside. Because, really, our agenda is the collective progress of each and every community in the country and the citizens that inhabit it. The organization teems with very good and intelligent technical personnel—we’ve got urban planners, environmental advocates, social scientists and future lawyers—and while we know what is ought to be done, we still need a figure that would not just boss around and demand that we produce results for the day. More than that, we need a figure that would really lead us— the one who would set the goals that should be achieved within a given time frame and the things that should be done in order to achieve those goals, tell us that we are wrong, why we are wrong and what should we do to make things right and value us based on the outputs and efforts that have made and initiated.

In the end, I know that finding a better leader would take some time, but I really pray hard that that time would come the soonest possible. That is before everyone becomes jaded and ends up quitting. In the meantime, I pledge to be more efficient and productive with my job. I would do the things that are expected of me based on the terms of reference I have signed. I cannot promise not to engage in ranting as this would be the only outlet for my future pent-up angst and disappointments. Hahaha. But I do promise to limit this to me- sessions with the “me- sessionistas.” J My patience threshold is amazingly good so I foresee that I won’t be quitting my job sooner. Sabe nga, we can do all things through Christ who strengthens us. I chose this path and I mean to learn and experience everything and every lesson out there for my own personal growth and development. Life gave me lemons, it would just be good to enjoy the lemonade that comes out of it instead of sulking each and every day.

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felix felicis: Why Employees Leave Work?

Friday, October 26, 2012

Why Employees Leave Work?


A debater posted something about why employees leave their work and I thought it would be nice to share it everyone so I reposted it in my Facebook status. I also felt the need to elaborate and reflect on it so I’m reposting it yet again here in my blog. Here’s what I read:

It came up with this surprising finding: if you're losing good people, look to their immediate supervisor. More than any other single reason, he is the reason people stay and thrive in an organization. And he's the reason why they quit, taking their knowledge, experience and contacts with them. Often, straight to the competition.

“People leave managers not companies,” write the authors Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman. “So much money has been thrown at the challenge of keeping good people—in the form of better pay, better perks and better training—when, in the end, turnover is mostly a manager issue.” If you have a turnover problem, look first to your manager and supervisors.

Beyond a point, an employee’s primary need has less to do with money and more to do with how he’s treated and how valued he feels. Much of this depends directly on the immediate manager.


While reflecting on that passage I read, I remember how the family usually spend dinner time by asking about what happened to each other’s days. I remembered how my mother talks about her day’s work inside the house and the movies she was able to watch within the day; Father on his Bible study groups and students at the Bible College he’s teaching in; my brothers and sister about school and rides home while I tell them things I learned from work and new stories I got from officemates. Most of the time, I share funny things that happened during work hours or topics we discussed during meetings. And then sometimes, I end up ranting over things that are beyond my control—a project that got sidelined because of tardiness, position papers that got watered down because of several political accommodations, attitude clashes between powers-that-be that affect the whole working environment and many more. I told my parents that felt like this shouldn’t be the case especially if the organization’s goal is for development and better governance. Then they told me that this is something that is very much common in workplaces. There’s office politics and people who relish bad mouthing other people or spreading rumors and bad vibes just when they feel like to. On one hand, my mother advised me to stay away from such people or if they cannot be avoided because we are a small organization, limit mingling with them lest I become a bearer of bad vibes too. On the other, my father told me to just do my job the best way that I can and deliver what is expected of me. After all, I came there to work and hone my skills. Relationships cultivated inside the workplace, while necessary, is still secondary to work productivity. He also told me that I should choose the people I trust carefully, hence the me-sessions group. Hehe.

Anyways, I know I shouldn’t be saying these things and that I promised myself that this should be a happy blog—free from the perversions of the world outside, but I feel that I just had to share these to everyone. I wouldn’t elaborate on the flaws I see inside our organization because that is something to be first, internal and confidential, but second, it is unethical to do so.

Mr. Richards is right when he said that “Beyond a point, an employee’s primary need has less to do with money and more to do with how he’s treated and how valued he feels. Much of this depends directly on the immediate manager.” But I also think that the other half of this much also depends on the employee—our dispositions and outlooks in life and in work have a similar effect on us the same way our bosses or co-workers affect our outputs. While our bosses may be too grumpy, lazy, domineering or if he takes too much credit on good things you really did, an onus is still placed on us on how we will effectively deal with these. Do we take these situations seriously that we plot how to torture our bosses to death or do we take things lightly and pass it off as another ego-pumping streak for your boss? I dunno with you, but most of time I take these lightly. First, because it wouldn’t do me any good to sulk in the corner and keep all that anger inside me. The sinful thoughts of anger and “murder” I hatch would just make me sick. But second, because doing so would not make me any better than them. Stooping down to their levels and trying to deflate their egos and pride by crossing fires with them or talking behind their back would be an insult to my intelligence and integrity. Sure, I feel bad sometimes, getting sidelined and all, but well, who doesn’t? Coupling that with a lot of hard feelings would just make us guilty overtime. So, keber!

In a nutshell, I believe that it is of great importance that we find a leadership that would inspire us to do better and motivate us to achieve more than those we are doing right now. The problems we face inside are rooted with the way the whole team is led—the people who steer us should guide us to the right direction, “matuwid na landas” as the President reiterated. We’ve already taken steps towards contributing to local government development and nation-building; I think it is high time for us to push further the envelope and go beyond the usual and of course, leave all the politicking aside. Because, really, our agenda is the collective progress of each and every community in the country and the citizens that inhabit it. The organization teems with very good and intelligent technical personnel—we’ve got urban planners, environmental advocates, social scientists and future lawyers—and while we know what is ought to be done, we still need a figure that would not just boss around and demand that we produce results for the day. More than that, we need a figure that would really lead us— the one who would set the goals that should be achieved within a given time frame and the things that should be done in order to achieve those goals, tell us that we are wrong, why we are wrong and what should we do to make things right and value us based on the outputs and efforts that have made and initiated.

In the end, I know that finding a better leader would take some time, but I really pray hard that that time would come the soonest possible. That is before everyone becomes jaded and ends up quitting. In the meantime, I pledge to be more efficient and productive with my job. I would do the things that are expected of me based on the terms of reference I have signed. I cannot promise not to engage in ranting as this would be the only outlet for my future pent-up angst and disappointments. Hahaha. But I do promise to limit this to me- sessions with the “me- sessionistas.” J My patience threshold is amazingly good so I foresee that I won’t be quitting my job sooner. Sabe nga, we can do all things through Christ who strengthens us. I chose this path and I mean to learn and experience everything and every lesson out there for my own personal growth and development. Life gave me lemons, it would just be good to enjoy the lemonade that comes out of it instead of sulking each and every day.

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