The Listener's Malady

Ang problema, masyadong maraming matalino.
Kaya ang siste, di patatalo sa diskurso.
Aba’y Koya, kung nakinig ka nalang muna,
Baka sakaling nalaman mong parehas lang ang inyong nasa.
Mas madalas kasing nais nating magpasikat
Kesa manahimik sandali at saka sumipat.
Pagkatapos, pag-isipang muli kung mahalaga ang sasabihin,
Saka lamang bigkasin ang nasa isipin
Hindi yung salita ka ng salita,
Nang-aaway pa ng kapwa.
Maninisi’t papansinin ang lahat ng makitang mali ng iba,
Kapag binalikan naman lahat ng sinabi niya,
Wala palang kwenta.
Ahay!
Kamot ulo ka nalang at kung minsan may mura pang kasama.
Hindi naman sa bawal ka ng magsalita,
Lalo na't kung liko at di naayon sa tama ang sinambitla.
Ang sa akin lamang pag-isipan at pag-isipan mo pa ng ikalawa
Nang di mapahiya.
Upang kapag sinuring maigi ang sasabihing dalita,
Siguradong makukuha ang kanilang paggalang at simpatiya
Bukod dito, pahahalagahan pa ang iyong mga naibahaging ideya.

This was written in the middle of a discussion over several policy issues. Ever since I began sitting in meetings, public hearings and seminars or whatever gathering, I’ve always thought that the best contribution I could make is to listen to the speaker share his/her thoughts over a certain issue or topic. From there, I could mull over the thoughts and arguments he made. If I find several of his/her points illogical or factually incorrect, I do mental debates. What if this happens or another situation takes place? If I change a variable, would the same outcome be revealed or would there be a significant change? To begin with, are my points even plausible or are they plain irrelevant? Most of the time, I find it a bit rude when people butt in their comments over a program or policy issue. But what annoys me most is when these BIRs (best in recitation, that is) start to over-argue (if there’s such a word) their cases. I mean, I already get your point, so get it over with. Don’t bore me with your litanies and endless gibbers that this should have been done, that should not have been the main point or we could have at least used this or that method. The thing is it was already done—whatever that may be. So, because you can’t change it for now, what can you do to improve the situation or what is your proposed solution that is will best benefit your target audience/beneficiaries? The same goes when you are writing a commentary or whatever paper that requires your stand or opinion on things. When tweeting or posting your statuses or comments on popular social networking sites, such a reminder should also be followed religiously. Think before you click. Or else, you may end up hurting or offending other people, which totally sucks big time. You don’t want to be cyberbullied or anything, in the end.

In sum, this Chinese proverb says it best, to talk much and arrive nowhere is the same as climbing a tree to catch a fish.” So there—these are just my two cents worth on speaking your hearts and minds out. It matters that you make yourself heard. But what matters most is that you are speaking out the right words at the right time with the right voice. J

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felix felicis: The Listener's Malady

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

The Listener's Malady

Ang problema, masyadong maraming matalino.
Kaya ang siste, di patatalo sa diskurso.
Aba’y Koya, kung nakinig ka nalang muna,
Baka sakaling nalaman mong parehas lang ang inyong nasa.
Mas madalas kasing nais nating magpasikat
Kesa manahimik sandali at saka sumipat.
Pagkatapos, pag-isipang muli kung mahalaga ang sasabihin,
Saka lamang bigkasin ang nasa isipin
Hindi yung salita ka ng salita,
Nang-aaway pa ng kapwa.
Maninisi’t papansinin ang lahat ng makitang mali ng iba,
Kapag binalikan naman lahat ng sinabi niya,
Wala palang kwenta.
Ahay!
Kamot ulo ka nalang at kung minsan may mura pang kasama.
Hindi naman sa bawal ka ng magsalita,
Lalo na't kung liko at di naayon sa tama ang sinambitla.
Ang sa akin lamang pag-isipan at pag-isipan mo pa ng ikalawa
Nang di mapahiya.
Upang kapag sinuring maigi ang sasabihing dalita,
Siguradong makukuha ang kanilang paggalang at simpatiya
Bukod dito, pahahalagahan pa ang iyong mga naibahaging ideya.

This was written in the middle of a discussion over several policy issues. Ever since I began sitting in meetings, public hearings and seminars or whatever gathering, I’ve always thought that the best contribution I could make is to listen to the speaker share his/her thoughts over a certain issue or topic. From there, I could mull over the thoughts and arguments he made. If I find several of his/her points illogical or factually incorrect, I do mental debates. What if this happens or another situation takes place? If I change a variable, would the same outcome be revealed or would there be a significant change? To begin with, are my points even plausible or are they plain irrelevant? Most of the time, I find it a bit rude when people butt in their comments over a program or policy issue. But what annoys me most is when these BIRs (best in recitation, that is) start to over-argue (if there’s such a word) their cases. I mean, I already get your point, so get it over with. Don’t bore me with your litanies and endless gibbers that this should have been done, that should not have been the main point or we could have at least used this or that method. The thing is it was already done—whatever that may be. So, because you can’t change it for now, what can you do to improve the situation or what is your proposed solution that is will best benefit your target audience/beneficiaries? The same goes when you are writing a commentary or whatever paper that requires your stand or opinion on things. When tweeting or posting your statuses or comments on popular social networking sites, such a reminder should also be followed religiously. Think before you click. Or else, you may end up hurting or offending other people, which totally sucks big time. You don’t want to be cyberbullied or anything, in the end.

In sum, this Chinese proverb says it best, to talk much and arrive nowhere is the same as climbing a tree to catch a fish.” So there—these are just my two cents worth on speaking your hearts and minds out. It matters that you make yourself heard. But what matters most is that you are speaking out the right words at the right time with the right voice. J

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

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