Movie on a Monday

Last week was hectic. This week’s proving to be one. But, of course, it was all worth the fun. On Monday, we decided to give ourselves an early weekend by catching the limited release of Rurouni Kenshin in SM Cinemas. So how did the live action fare?

Rumors of bringing the English-dubbed live action to Philippine cinemas started as early as June or July with mid-August as the possible release date in all SM Cinemas. A lot of my friends in social networking sites buzzed with excitement because of this news—most of them fans of the animated series. I wasn’t a hardcore fan although I was able to watch the Tagalized animated version in TV during my grade school years. I actually forgot the storyline—all I knew was that Kenshin Himura was a former samurai who changed his act for good and went on protecting the vulnerable and the weak. The only villain I remember was the guy whose body was wrapped with linen cloth all over. The rest was already a blur. Nonetheless, I was still excited to catch the live-action as I know it would be something fresh and new for avid moviegoers like us. Hehehehe.

Since I don’t have any concrete point of comparison (I can’t remember the series very clearly), I felt the movie in itself was very good. It’s like watching a cosplay parade with a complete story and outstanding fight scenes. Hahaha. The movie’s plot was set during the early years of the Meiji period in Japan with a ruthless assassin Kenshin Himura (also known as the Battosai) as its central character. After defeating his enemies in the Bakumatsu War, Kenshin decided to leave behind his life as an assassin and instead offered his help to those who needed it. During these peaceful times in Japan, an opium dealer operates underground to disturb the peace of the empire while another assassin posing himself as the Battosai goes on a killing rampage. The fake Battosai threatens Kaoru’s life who in turn will be saved by Kenshin. After saving her life, Kaoru and Kenshin would soon become friends and try to rebuild the dojo left by Kaoru’s father. Kenshin would also meet Kaoru’s lone student Myojin, a beautiful doctor Megumi and a former street fighter Sanosuke. The story would soon take its course as this group would form an unlikely alliance against opium dealer Kanryu and the fake Battosai, Jin.

As said, the movie, overall, was very good. The plot was well-written with each character given the opportunity to be expounded on various layers of storytelling. Kenshin’s current commitment to promoting peace instead of provoking aggression was given more depth with the small flashbacks in between major plot points. I also appreciated the idea of using color schemes to influence the feel of a certain scene—hues of blue and grey were used in war and other fight scenes while a merry mix of greens and yellows with patches of red and orange for the happier scenes. Flashbacks were shown in black and white. Such concept, I guess, helped set the mood and the tone for the audience. I also felt that the movie was beautifully scored. The background music enhanced the overall experience of the movie—it wasn’t your usual fare of Oriental-sounding music which had been a staple for most period movies. Of course, every moviegoer gushed on the movie’s exceptional fight scenes. I especially liked the fight scene between Kenshin and Sanosuke where the latter challenged the former to prove who’s better. Kenshin won of course (sarreh, spoiler) but the battle between a sword and a horsemeat cutter is an entertaining and exceptional fight. I also had fun watching Sanosuke and Kanryu’s man’s fist fight scene. Hahaha! I guess the crowd enjoyed this too.

Because of the movie’s impressive gross sales, a sequel live action is on the pipeline. Yippeeeeee! I hope that the sequel will be shown immediately here in the Philippines! Hahaha. J

5 out of 5 stars

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felix felicis: Movie on a Monday

Monday, December 17, 2012

Movie on a Monday

Last week was hectic. This week’s proving to be one. But, of course, it was all worth the fun. On Monday, we decided to give ourselves an early weekend by catching the limited release of Rurouni Kenshin in SM Cinemas. So how did the live action fare?

Rumors of bringing the English-dubbed live action to Philippine cinemas started as early as June or July with mid-August as the possible release date in all SM Cinemas. A lot of my friends in social networking sites buzzed with excitement because of this news—most of them fans of the animated series. I wasn’t a hardcore fan although I was able to watch the Tagalized animated version in TV during my grade school years. I actually forgot the storyline—all I knew was that Kenshin Himura was a former samurai who changed his act for good and went on protecting the vulnerable and the weak. The only villain I remember was the guy whose body was wrapped with linen cloth all over. The rest was already a blur. Nonetheless, I was still excited to catch the live-action as I know it would be something fresh and new for avid moviegoers like us. Hehehehe.

Since I don’t have any concrete point of comparison (I can’t remember the series very clearly), I felt the movie in itself was very good. It’s like watching a cosplay parade with a complete story and outstanding fight scenes. Hahaha. The movie’s plot was set during the early years of the Meiji period in Japan with a ruthless assassin Kenshin Himura (also known as the Battosai) as its central character. After defeating his enemies in the Bakumatsu War, Kenshin decided to leave behind his life as an assassin and instead offered his help to those who needed it. During these peaceful times in Japan, an opium dealer operates underground to disturb the peace of the empire while another assassin posing himself as the Battosai goes on a killing rampage. The fake Battosai threatens Kaoru’s life who in turn will be saved by Kenshin. After saving her life, Kaoru and Kenshin would soon become friends and try to rebuild the dojo left by Kaoru’s father. Kenshin would also meet Kaoru’s lone student Myojin, a beautiful doctor Megumi and a former street fighter Sanosuke. The story would soon take its course as this group would form an unlikely alliance against opium dealer Kanryu and the fake Battosai, Jin.

As said, the movie, overall, was very good. The plot was well-written with each character given the opportunity to be expounded on various layers of storytelling. Kenshin’s current commitment to promoting peace instead of provoking aggression was given more depth with the small flashbacks in between major plot points. I also appreciated the idea of using color schemes to influence the feel of a certain scene—hues of blue and grey were used in war and other fight scenes while a merry mix of greens and yellows with patches of red and orange for the happier scenes. Flashbacks were shown in black and white. Such concept, I guess, helped set the mood and the tone for the audience. I also felt that the movie was beautifully scored. The background music enhanced the overall experience of the movie—it wasn’t your usual fare of Oriental-sounding music which had been a staple for most period movies. Of course, every moviegoer gushed on the movie’s exceptional fight scenes. I especially liked the fight scene between Kenshin and Sanosuke where the latter challenged the former to prove who’s better. Kenshin won of course (sarreh, spoiler) but the battle between a sword and a horsemeat cutter is an entertaining and exceptional fight. I also had fun watching Sanosuke and Kanryu’s man’s fist fight scene. Hahaha! I guess the crowd enjoyed this too.

Because of the movie’s impressive gross sales, a sequel live action is on the pipeline. Yippeeeeee! I hope that the sequel will be shown immediately here in the Philippines! Hahaha. J

5 out of 5 stars

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