Weekend at Chinatown

Because we're too hipster to go to Binondo on a Chinese New Year.
Places filled with history and culture had always perked the curious side of me. That’s the reason why despite the dingy nature of Manila, I’ve always clung to the nostalgia of its glorious past. For one, the oldest Chinatown, probably in Asia or even in the world, is a place I look forward to visiting. Its semi-dark allies and narrow ins and outs make for an urban adventure. My parents have always brought us there for the usual Chinese food fare and then in high school, when I learned the ropes of public commuting and Manila traffic, my friends and I would usually sneak to Divisoria via Binondo. I forgot it on college because we chose to seek refuge from the different eateries along Teresa Street.

And then, just last year, after reading several blogs sharing their awesome gastronomic experience in Chinatown’s hole-in-the-wall restos, I decided to give it a try. The first trip was with my siblings, I made a blog entry for that. The second was with Ate Fina and Ate Anna. It was a bit of a let-down because we weren’t able to really roam around. The first culprit was were all tired from our own morning activities but second because my two companions wolfed down a big bowl of congee each. So much for the supposed food trip. Hahaha.

The third trip was much better and extra special (naks). We’re celebrating Kuya Alvin’s and Manay Joy’s birthdays plus we have a tour guide. Awesome! The foodies were me, Ate Fina, Kuya Paulie, Kuya Fids, Ms Jeni of UNDP (who has a very nice camera, I must say), Manay Joy, Kuya Alvin and his friends. All in all, we finished 11 restaurants and snack places—from Binondo’s heart in Ongpin until the relatively far Soler Street which was near Recto Avenue na. The photos below would tell the whole story for me. 

For more photos, you may visit my photoblog at www.kyemeruth.jux.com. J

Chopstixx mastery level: Still amateur but taking ground. Hahaha.
Team Binondo goes wacky in front of Dong Bei Dumplings in Yuchengco Street.


Peach cheber at Cafe Mezzanine.
Interior. Cafe Mezzanine.


The famed Halo-Halo at Cafe Mezzanine. According to Kuya Alvin, this is their bestseller. 
Cafe Mezzanine.


Team Binondo in front of Cafe Mezzanine.


Binondo's busy lane.


Chinese Holland. The happy hopia. 
Welcome to Chinatown! 
Chinese stuff by the bangketa.


Kiat-kiat. This is would make a nice Christmas tree. Hahaha.


Bahay kubo and non-bahay kubo gulay on carts.


The Hiding Place. Historians said that the original manuscript of JP Rizal's Noli Me Tangere was kept here. The said house is owned by Higino Francisco, one of the supporters of the revolutionary forces during the Spanish era.


The place is now an apartment and is flanked by small stores below. Sorry, the manong never left the frame.
Office people showing off their yummy fried siopaos. We're along Benavidez Street yata.


Along Benavidez. If I'm not mistaken.


Salazar Bakery at Salazar Street. Also famous for its hopia variants.


Tikoy overload.


Omens and symbols. The Chinese are known for the different animals that bring good fortune to their lives.


Seafood Pancit for looooong life.


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felix felicis: Weekend at Chinatown

Friday, February 8, 2013

Weekend at Chinatown

Because we're too hipster to go to Binondo on a Chinese New Year.
Places filled with history and culture had always perked the curious side of me. That’s the reason why despite the dingy nature of Manila, I’ve always clung to the nostalgia of its glorious past. For one, the oldest Chinatown, probably in Asia or even in the world, is a place I look forward to visiting. Its semi-dark allies and narrow ins and outs make for an urban adventure. My parents have always brought us there for the usual Chinese food fare and then in high school, when I learned the ropes of public commuting and Manila traffic, my friends and I would usually sneak to Divisoria via Binondo. I forgot it on college because we chose to seek refuge from the different eateries along Teresa Street.

And then, just last year, after reading several blogs sharing their awesome gastronomic experience in Chinatown’s hole-in-the-wall restos, I decided to give it a try. The first trip was with my siblings, I made a blog entry for that. The second was with Ate Fina and Ate Anna. It was a bit of a let-down because we weren’t able to really roam around. The first culprit was were all tired from our own morning activities but second because my two companions wolfed down a big bowl of congee each. So much for the supposed food trip. Hahaha.

The third trip was much better and extra special (naks). We’re celebrating Kuya Alvin’s and Manay Joy’s birthdays plus we have a tour guide. Awesome! The foodies were me, Ate Fina, Kuya Paulie, Kuya Fids, Ms Jeni of UNDP (who has a very nice camera, I must say), Manay Joy, Kuya Alvin and his friends. All in all, we finished 11 restaurants and snack places—from Binondo’s heart in Ongpin until the relatively far Soler Street which was near Recto Avenue na. The photos below would tell the whole story for me. 

For more photos, you may visit my photoblog at www.kyemeruth.jux.com. J

Chopstixx mastery level: Still amateur but taking ground. Hahaha.
Team Binondo goes wacky in front of Dong Bei Dumplings in Yuchengco Street.


Peach cheber at Cafe Mezzanine.
Interior. Cafe Mezzanine.


The famed Halo-Halo at Cafe Mezzanine. According to Kuya Alvin, this is their bestseller. 
Cafe Mezzanine.


Team Binondo in front of Cafe Mezzanine.


Binondo's busy lane.


Chinese Holland. The happy hopia. 
Welcome to Chinatown! 
Chinese stuff by the bangketa.


Kiat-kiat. This is would make a nice Christmas tree. Hahaha.


Bahay kubo and non-bahay kubo gulay on carts.


The Hiding Place. Historians said that the original manuscript of JP Rizal's Noli Me Tangere was kept here. The said house is owned by Higino Francisco, one of the supporters of the revolutionary forces during the Spanish era.


The place is now an apartment and is flanked by small stores below. Sorry, the manong never left the frame.
Office people showing off their yummy fried siopaos. We're along Benavidez Street yata.


Along Benavidez. If I'm not mistaken.


Salazar Bakery at Salazar Street. Also famous for its hopia variants.


Tikoy overload.


Omens and symbols. The Chinese are known for the different animals that bring good fortune to their lives.


Seafood Pancit for looooong life.


Labels: , , , , , , , ,

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