Gatsby? What Gatsby?

From Paste Magazine
“They’re a rotten crowd,” I shouted across the lawn.
 “You’re worth the whole damn bunch put together.”

I had always been curious of F.Scott Fitzgerald’s Gatsby. Maybe because I’ve seen it in every to-read list I’ve come across. We never had the chance to read it in our high school lit class because we focused too much on Edgar Allan Poe’s short stories, Beowulf and Dante Alighieri’s Inferno. Not that I don’t like them—I think that those stories really pushed me to read more literary pieces. It’s just that I felt we could have covered more literary masterpieces from the industry’s giants. But of course, that could be the subject of a whole new blog entry. Back to Gatsby.

I had the chance to borrow a copy from my office seatmate who is a fellow book hoarder. We suddenly had this habit of recommending titles and exchanging books. Hehe. I could have stuck with the e-book copy I illegally downloaded from the web but the smell of an old book just did the trick. Haha! For almost a week, my train rides to and from the office were spent listening to reading Nick Carraway’s narration on Gatsby’s life.

The first few pages were slightly boring. Or maybe it’s just the language. Just the same, I went on reading. Several more pages and I was actually enjoying the story. The Great Gatsby has a simple plot. Carraway, a struggling stocks agent in the 1920s and the story’s narrator, happened to become the neighbor of millionaire Jay Gatsby in a fictional town called West Egg. Every week, people from all over New York are flocking to Gatsby’s mansion for a night of merrymaking. Amid all the sparkle and glitter of his lavish parties, Carraway knew that Gatsby had only wanted to impress his teenage love: Daisy Buchanan. Such quest would significantly affect Gatsby’s fate in the end.

A friend (that’s our office ED) asked what I thought about the movie and the book and here’s what I told him. I liked the story even if it ended in an unhappy note. It was tragic and heartbreaking and at the same time beautiful. Of course, it was totally unfair to pin every single accusation to Gatsby while the Buchanans get to run away (sorry, spoiler). We could say the same to things that happen to us along the way—we’re blamed for things we did not do, and worse, we haven’t got any chance to defend ourselves. But the truthfulness evoked until the end was something that really got me. Injustice happens, even to the best of us. And while some get their dose of revenge or redemption, many more are not given that chance. So what do we do? I could say that Mr Wilson’s “God see’s everything,” statement before he set on looking the yellow car, was something we could hold onto. Or that everything will fall into its own places in due time. I don’t really know. I guess we’ll know it when unjust experiences come to us. For now, it’s a truth that we’d have to live through.

I’d like to think he agreed and then he said that he’s quite amused or curious or whatever that I thought about the story this way. I can’t remember my reply. Hahaha!

*****
In other news, I watched the movie even before I finished the book. Hahaha! Anyhoo, no problem with that. I still finished it and I could say that the movie adaptation remained faithful to the original story. Baz Luhrmann and his team may have omitted several parts but it did not affect the overall feel and impact of the movie.

Similar to other movies Luhrmann headed, Gatsby was as splendidly designed as his other signature works (read: Moulin Rouge, Australia, Romeo and Juliet). It was also a nice move to infuse today’s hiphop and RnB tunes in the movie’s lavish party scenes. It’s like 1920’s Jazz reinvented.

4.5 out of 5


Found this over the net—Gatsby character map! Geeky and nice. Read on. Hahahahaha!


Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

felix felicis: Gatsby? What Gatsby?

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Gatsby? What Gatsby?

From Paste Magazine
“They’re a rotten crowd,” I shouted across the lawn.
 “You’re worth the whole damn bunch put together.”

I had always been curious of F.Scott Fitzgerald’s Gatsby. Maybe because I’ve seen it in every to-read list I’ve come across. We never had the chance to read it in our high school lit class because we focused too much on Edgar Allan Poe’s short stories, Beowulf and Dante Alighieri’s Inferno. Not that I don’t like them—I think that those stories really pushed me to read more literary pieces. It’s just that I felt we could have covered more literary masterpieces from the industry’s giants. But of course, that could be the subject of a whole new blog entry. Back to Gatsby.

I had the chance to borrow a copy from my office seatmate who is a fellow book hoarder. We suddenly had this habit of recommending titles and exchanging books. Hehe. I could have stuck with the e-book copy I illegally downloaded from the web but the smell of an old book just did the trick. Haha! For almost a week, my train rides to and from the office were spent listening to reading Nick Carraway’s narration on Gatsby’s life.

The first few pages were slightly boring. Or maybe it’s just the language. Just the same, I went on reading. Several more pages and I was actually enjoying the story. The Great Gatsby has a simple plot. Carraway, a struggling stocks agent in the 1920s and the story’s narrator, happened to become the neighbor of millionaire Jay Gatsby in a fictional town called West Egg. Every week, people from all over New York are flocking to Gatsby’s mansion for a night of merrymaking. Amid all the sparkle and glitter of his lavish parties, Carraway knew that Gatsby had only wanted to impress his teenage love: Daisy Buchanan. Such quest would significantly affect Gatsby’s fate in the end.

A friend (that’s our office ED) asked what I thought about the movie and the book and here’s what I told him. I liked the story even if it ended in an unhappy note. It was tragic and heartbreaking and at the same time beautiful. Of course, it was totally unfair to pin every single accusation to Gatsby while the Buchanans get to run away (sorry, spoiler). We could say the same to things that happen to us along the way—we’re blamed for things we did not do, and worse, we haven’t got any chance to defend ourselves. But the truthfulness evoked until the end was something that really got me. Injustice happens, even to the best of us. And while some get their dose of revenge or redemption, many more are not given that chance. So what do we do? I could say that Mr Wilson’s “God see’s everything,” statement before he set on looking the yellow car, was something we could hold onto. Or that everything will fall into its own places in due time. I don’t really know. I guess we’ll know it when unjust experiences come to us. For now, it’s a truth that we’d have to live through.

I’d like to think he agreed and then he said that he’s quite amused or curious or whatever that I thought about the story this way. I can’t remember my reply. Hahaha!

*****
In other news, I watched the movie even before I finished the book. Hahaha! Anyhoo, no problem with that. I still finished it and I could say that the movie adaptation remained faithful to the original story. Baz Luhrmann and his team may have omitted several parts but it did not affect the overall feel and impact of the movie.

Similar to other movies Luhrmann headed, Gatsby was as splendidly designed as his other signature works (read: Moulin Rouge, Australia, Romeo and Juliet). It was also a nice move to infuse today’s hiphop and RnB tunes in the movie’s lavish party scenes. It’s like 1920’s Jazz reinvented.

4.5 out of 5


Found this over the net—Gatsby character map! Geeky and nice. Read on. Hahahahaha!


Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home