Two cents on election day



A few more hours and we’ll be heading to the polls to cast our votes. To think 2010 was just like a few years ago and it was my first time to vote. Wow. This will be my second time. The excitement to use the machines diminished a bit but the interest to participate in yet another political exercise remains to be seen.

I should have written this before, but I haven’t got much time to sit down and just type down the words for this entry. Anyhoo, here are my two cents worth of advice for those people exercising their right duty to vote on the 13th.

First off, it has to be clear that as much as voting is a right we hold, it is also a duty that we have to be responsible for. Cliché as it may sound but Peter Parker’s uncle was right when he said that “with great power, comes great responsibility.” When you cast your vote later (that’s when the sun’s up), you’re not only doing things for yourself—you’re doing this, along with everyone else, for your fellowmen. If you choose to vote for a bad guy, and he happens to win, you really don’t have much ascendancy to complain because in the first place, you’re one of the people who put him to power. If the bad guy you chose happens to lose the race, that’s one good thing. But remember that the choice you made reflects the priorities and principles you hold. Now, if you choose not to exercise that right, stay at home or somewhere else to spend the whole day bumming around, then we really can’t do anything about that. But remember that you don’t have the right to complain if bad things start happening and it’s affecting you big time. That’s because you never participated in the elections: you did not make a choice, no you made a choice, and that’s to abstain from the whole democratic process. You did not just squander your only chance to contribute to putting good people in the position, you even mindlessly allowed evil to perpetuate by choosing to keep mum. So there, you have to use that right and do your duty of serving the country by putting good people into office.

But secondly, you don’t just vote. You also think about the choices you make. When you entered college, you choose a school that would be able to help you get through university life. When you eat in the restaurant, you don’t just choose Waldorf salad over chicken—you think about your appetite and even factor in the budget you have. When you shop, you don’t choose one dress from the other just at once. You think of what color will suit you or what design will flatter you. The same decision-making process can be applied when exercising our right to vote.

We don’t just put people in those public positions—we think of who to choose first because we know that the country’s and the people’s direction lies on their wisdom and ingenuity. So if we choose to put people who don’t even know how a bill becomes a law or how to properly engage in an intellectual discussion, I’m thinking we’re going to have a bad time.

Again remember, we are in a representative democracy so the people we choose to be on those positions REPRESENT us in many ways—our concerns, our aspirations and even the dreams we have. So putting dumb people there, as said, kind off reflects the level of dumbness we have as a people. We wouldn’t allow that so, no to dumb, opportunistic, agenda-setting politicians in our government.

Finally, the same family name does not mean much when it comes to public policy making. What your father or mother or elder sibling did, for that matter may or may not mean the same good policies implemented before. It maybe difficult to gamble for newer names and fresher faces in our legislative bodies, but I guess it is worth that risk. After all, elections are a democratic tool to ensure that power is properly and efficiently passed on from one citizen to another. Keeping it to one person or to the same family certainly goes against our understanding of democracy.

Again, we have to remember that they are just our representatives. We hold that power over them so being greedy on that brings more harm than good to a fledling nation like ours. Dr. Nicole Curato was right when she said that “Good dynasties are those willng to wither away.”

Power, prestige and fame maybe nice and beautiul and fun at times. But the longer we hold on to it, we end up paranoid. We continue to cling not knowing that we’re slowly drifting apart—the same way that had happened to Queen Cersei in the series A Game of Thrones.

These things have always been easier said than done. But it’s better to remind people of these even at the last minute. We’ve always wanted a better country of our own—a society we can be prouder of. I say, we start later when we mark those spheres and dye our nails. The results of our hardwork may take so much time; it is still worth that investment. 

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felix felicis: Two cents on election day

Monday, May 13, 2013

Two cents on election day



A few more hours and we’ll be heading to the polls to cast our votes. To think 2010 was just like a few years ago and it was my first time to vote. Wow. This will be my second time. The excitement to use the machines diminished a bit but the interest to participate in yet another political exercise remains to be seen.

I should have written this before, but I haven’t got much time to sit down and just type down the words for this entry. Anyhoo, here are my two cents worth of advice for those people exercising their right duty to vote on the 13th.

First off, it has to be clear that as much as voting is a right we hold, it is also a duty that we have to be responsible for. Cliché as it may sound but Peter Parker’s uncle was right when he said that “with great power, comes great responsibility.” When you cast your vote later (that’s when the sun’s up), you’re not only doing things for yourself—you’re doing this, along with everyone else, for your fellowmen. If you choose to vote for a bad guy, and he happens to win, you really don’t have much ascendancy to complain because in the first place, you’re one of the people who put him to power. If the bad guy you chose happens to lose the race, that’s one good thing. But remember that the choice you made reflects the priorities and principles you hold. Now, if you choose not to exercise that right, stay at home or somewhere else to spend the whole day bumming around, then we really can’t do anything about that. But remember that you don’t have the right to complain if bad things start happening and it’s affecting you big time. That’s because you never participated in the elections: you did not make a choice, no you made a choice, and that’s to abstain from the whole democratic process. You did not just squander your only chance to contribute to putting good people in the position, you even mindlessly allowed evil to perpetuate by choosing to keep mum. So there, you have to use that right and do your duty of serving the country by putting good people into office.

But secondly, you don’t just vote. You also think about the choices you make. When you entered college, you choose a school that would be able to help you get through university life. When you eat in the restaurant, you don’t just choose Waldorf salad over chicken—you think about your appetite and even factor in the budget you have. When you shop, you don’t choose one dress from the other just at once. You think of what color will suit you or what design will flatter you. The same decision-making process can be applied when exercising our right to vote.

We don’t just put people in those public positions—we think of who to choose first because we know that the country’s and the people’s direction lies on their wisdom and ingenuity. So if we choose to put people who don’t even know how a bill becomes a law or how to properly engage in an intellectual discussion, I’m thinking we’re going to have a bad time.

Again remember, we are in a representative democracy so the people we choose to be on those positions REPRESENT us in many ways—our concerns, our aspirations and even the dreams we have. So putting dumb people there, as said, kind off reflects the level of dumbness we have as a people. We wouldn’t allow that so, no to dumb, opportunistic, agenda-setting politicians in our government.

Finally, the same family name does not mean much when it comes to public policy making. What your father or mother or elder sibling did, for that matter may or may not mean the same good policies implemented before. It maybe difficult to gamble for newer names and fresher faces in our legislative bodies, but I guess it is worth that risk. After all, elections are a democratic tool to ensure that power is properly and efficiently passed on from one citizen to another. Keeping it to one person or to the same family certainly goes against our understanding of democracy.

Again, we have to remember that they are just our representatives. We hold that power over them so being greedy on that brings more harm than good to a fledling nation like ours. Dr. Nicole Curato was right when she said that “Good dynasties are those willng to wither away.”

Power, prestige and fame maybe nice and beautiul and fun at times. But the longer we hold on to it, we end up paranoid. We continue to cling not knowing that we’re slowly drifting apart—the same way that had happened to Queen Cersei in the series A Game of Thrones.

These things have always been easier said than done. But it’s better to remind people of these even at the last minute. We’ve always wanted a better country of our own—a society we can be prouder of. I say, we start later when we mark those spheres and dye our nails. The results of our hardwork may take so much time; it is still worth that investment. 

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