Book review backlogs

Summer break gave a lot of time to catch up on some nice fiction fix. Here’s a quick review on the some of the books I’ve read over the summer (because I already gave a separate review on the other’s [i.e. The Great Gatsby and The Hobbit] I’ve finished).

Crime and Punishment Fyodor Dostoevsky
Crime and Punishment was just really exhausting—the plot, the language and the characters. I felt like they were all drowning in a quagmire of despair and because I was too engrossed with the story, I, too, was falling on that same pit. I had to close the book for a day or two just to recover from all the angst and hopelessness Raskolnikov was feeling lest I be as nega as him too. But even with an exhausting plot, I felt that Raskolnikov’s story of redemption was something that’s really inspiring. He did something gravely wrong and while he escaped the physical constraints of being jailed, his guilt feelings hounded him all throughout the story. Towards the end, Raskolnikov was weighing things out—whether to admit his offense or not. I’ve always thought he made the right choice when he chose to spill things out—it made things easier for him. But of course, that’s a spoiler. Anyway, it wasn’t much of a happy ending but I’d like to believe it is justified.

My brother’s currently reading it before we finally return it to the owner. I’m planning to read it again when I get my own copy, when I’ve got more time to spare and when I feel that I’m emotionally stronger. Hahaha!

5 out of 5.

Paper Towns John Greene
This was the in-between book for Crime and Punishment. While I’m resting or trying to appease my shackled brain because of Dostoevsky’s asdfgjkl novel, I read Quentin Jacobsen’s diary story of how he met, befriended and loved Margo Roth Spiegelman, his childhood crush. The story was simple, nothing really exceptional except that it’s true most of the time. We spent so much time and effort for the people we like and then one day, when they get away, our lives take a dramatic turn. Or we expect something extraordinary to happen in our seemingly ordinary lives that we grab every opportunity to just walk away and leave everything else behind just so we can find a more suitable “life” we have. In the process, we end up hurting people close to us and eventually ourselves. Ahhh, but it’s all coming-of-age. Transition. We look for our better selves and we hope to find it in a much better condition. Char.

I posted on a separate entry the quotes I loved from the novel. If you need an easy read, this is recommended. I’ve been meaning to read Greene’s more famous novel The Fault in our Stars. Brother has a copy. I’m thinking of stealing borrowing it.

By the way, Quentin was eventually friendzoned by Margo. I think. Ooops, spoiler.

3.75 out of 5.

Fahrenheit 451 Ray Bradbury
I bought a copy out of curiosity. I thought I should give Bradbury a second chance even if he boggled me when I was in high school. Hmmm, I guess he did not fail me. I loved every bit of Fahrenheit—Guy Montag’s the guy, er the man. The story was set in a dystopian future, with firemen burning houses instead of preventing fires. Books are banned and people are encouraged to live their lives glued to a giant TV screen. Guy’s a firemen living with his ghost-like wife, Mildred. He meets his “weird” neighbor Clarisse one night and then everything else began to change—eventually, he’s running for his own life.

Fahrenheit made me appreciate books more. It inspires me to collect them and stack them in a library where other people can read it for free. I don’t know what I would be doing if I’m living in world like Guy’s—they burn books and book readers because their ideas might spawn action or rebellion. My house could have been burned for keeping way too many books or I may have succumbed to the pressure and decided to feed on TV shows. I don’t really know. Anyhoo, this is recommended reading.

5 out of 5.

Bared To You Sylvia Day
I veered away from staples and decided to read a book laced with so much romance. It killed me. Golay. Day’s Bared to You is the first installment of the Crossfire trilogy. The story revolves around the passionate and all-too consuming love affair between magnate Gideon Cross and socialite Eva. They both have scarred pasts and they have to overcome it before their relationship falls apart. Plot and X-rated scenes are way too much for me so I skimmed over the pages until I get to the semi-open ending.

If you like E.L. James’ 50 Shades series, this might also be a thing for you. But if not, might as well skip this.

1.5 out of 5.

Up next…
Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut
The Fault in our Stars by John Greene



I hope I find time to read fiction again. Gayatri Spivak ate my precious weekend just so I’ll be ready for my semi biglaang presentation in class. It all paid off naman. Prof said it was a good report (hay salamat po!) and congratulated me for getting by her highfalutin language. This week, Ileto and Said’s Orientalist theories are on my tab plus a myriad other essays in need of understanding. As said, I think I’m coping with these truckloads of readings but I really miss my fiction fix. Until next time I guess. Hehehehehe!

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felix felicis: Book review backlogs

Friday, June 21, 2013

Book review backlogs

Summer break gave a lot of time to catch up on some nice fiction fix. Here’s a quick review on the some of the books I’ve read over the summer (because I already gave a separate review on the other’s [i.e. The Great Gatsby and The Hobbit] I’ve finished).

Crime and Punishment Fyodor Dostoevsky
Crime and Punishment was just really exhausting—the plot, the language and the characters. I felt like they were all drowning in a quagmire of despair and because I was too engrossed with the story, I, too, was falling on that same pit. I had to close the book for a day or two just to recover from all the angst and hopelessness Raskolnikov was feeling lest I be as nega as him too. But even with an exhausting plot, I felt that Raskolnikov’s story of redemption was something that’s really inspiring. He did something gravely wrong and while he escaped the physical constraints of being jailed, his guilt feelings hounded him all throughout the story. Towards the end, Raskolnikov was weighing things out—whether to admit his offense or not. I’ve always thought he made the right choice when he chose to spill things out—it made things easier for him. But of course, that’s a spoiler. Anyway, it wasn’t much of a happy ending but I’d like to believe it is justified.

My brother’s currently reading it before we finally return it to the owner. I’m planning to read it again when I get my own copy, when I’ve got more time to spare and when I feel that I’m emotionally stronger. Hahaha!

5 out of 5.

Paper Towns John Greene
This was the in-between book for Crime and Punishment. While I’m resting or trying to appease my shackled brain because of Dostoevsky’s asdfgjkl novel, I read Quentin Jacobsen’s diary story of how he met, befriended and loved Margo Roth Spiegelman, his childhood crush. The story was simple, nothing really exceptional except that it’s true most of the time. We spent so much time and effort for the people we like and then one day, when they get away, our lives take a dramatic turn. Or we expect something extraordinary to happen in our seemingly ordinary lives that we grab every opportunity to just walk away and leave everything else behind just so we can find a more suitable “life” we have. In the process, we end up hurting people close to us and eventually ourselves. Ahhh, but it’s all coming-of-age. Transition. We look for our better selves and we hope to find it in a much better condition. Char.

I posted on a separate entry the quotes I loved from the novel. If you need an easy read, this is recommended. I’ve been meaning to read Greene’s more famous novel The Fault in our Stars. Brother has a copy. I’m thinking of stealing borrowing it.

By the way, Quentin was eventually friendzoned by Margo. I think. Ooops, spoiler.

3.75 out of 5.

Fahrenheit 451 Ray Bradbury
I bought a copy out of curiosity. I thought I should give Bradbury a second chance even if he boggled me when I was in high school. Hmmm, I guess he did not fail me. I loved every bit of Fahrenheit—Guy Montag’s the guy, er the man. The story was set in a dystopian future, with firemen burning houses instead of preventing fires. Books are banned and people are encouraged to live their lives glued to a giant TV screen. Guy’s a firemen living with his ghost-like wife, Mildred. He meets his “weird” neighbor Clarisse one night and then everything else began to change—eventually, he’s running for his own life.

Fahrenheit made me appreciate books more. It inspires me to collect them and stack them in a library where other people can read it for free. I don’t know what I would be doing if I’m living in world like Guy’s—they burn books and book readers because their ideas might spawn action or rebellion. My house could have been burned for keeping way too many books or I may have succumbed to the pressure and decided to feed on TV shows. I don’t really know. Anyhoo, this is recommended reading.

5 out of 5.

Bared To You Sylvia Day
I veered away from staples and decided to read a book laced with so much romance. It killed me. Golay. Day’s Bared to You is the first installment of the Crossfire trilogy. The story revolves around the passionate and all-too consuming love affair between magnate Gideon Cross and socialite Eva. They both have scarred pasts and they have to overcome it before their relationship falls apart. Plot and X-rated scenes are way too much for me so I skimmed over the pages until I get to the semi-open ending.

If you like E.L. James’ 50 Shades series, this might also be a thing for you. But if not, might as well skip this.

1.5 out of 5.

Up next…
Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut
The Fault in our Stars by John Greene



I hope I find time to read fiction again. Gayatri Spivak ate my precious weekend just so I’ll be ready for my semi biglaang presentation in class. It all paid off naman. Prof said it was a good report (hay salamat po!) and congratulated me for getting by her highfalutin language. This week, Ileto and Said’s Orientalist theories are on my tab plus a myriad other essays in need of understanding. As said, I think I’m coping with these truckloads of readings but I really miss my fiction fix. Until next time I guess. Hehehehehe!

Labels: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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