Movie marathon review (long weekend edition)

Last Tuesday, I grabbed the chance to slack things off and watch several recommended movies. Here’s a review for all three of them.

Oldboy (2004)
Director: Park Chan Wook
I came across this title when I was randomly surfing the net for recommended Asian films. After seeing its review at Rotten Tomatoes and IMDB, I downloaded a copy in advance in case I find a window time to watch it. Work and class suspension last Tuesday gave me enough time to watch this and two other movies.

The plot was simple. Oh Dae-su (Min-sik Choi), a drunkard and a bit of a troublemaker as portrayed in the earlier scenes of the movie, was suddenly detained in a dank and decrepit hotel room for 15 years. During those times, he subsisted on dumplings given by his captors and the company of the room’s television. From there, he learned that he was framed for murdering his wife and daughter and that he was on the run. Bent on getting even, Oh Dae-su spent his time shadow boxing and finding a way to escape his prison. Exactly 15 years after, he was released by his captor telling him to know who he is and why was he detained. The rest of the two-hour movie lays out how Oh Dae-su finds his captor, the reason for his detention and exacting revenge from the people who were accomplices to the harm done on him.

As said, the plot was simple. The plot twists, however, we’re totally bonkers, it’s so awesome. I was used to watching typical Korean romantic movies and dramas but I felt that the lyrical Korean language used perfectly contrasts and sharpens the grit in Park Chan Wook’s opus. The movie was both poetic and sad—it makes one think how our simple stories greatly affect how other people view their lives. One wrong word and it might spell vengeance from those we did wrong. Creepy.

For all its dark and beautiful cinematography, I’m giving it a perfect score. But enough warning is given: the movie shows a generous amount of violence, sex, and gore. If you’re a fan of Hurt Locker- District 9-like films, this might just be next in your line.

5 out of 5.

The Shawshank Redemption (1994) 
Director: Frank Darabont
Another recommended movie. The film is set in the 1940s at Shawshank State Prison. Based on a novella written by Stephen King, it tells the story of Andy Dufrense (Tim Robbins), a hotshot banker who was convicted of murdering his wife and his lover despite his pronouncement of innocence. He was then sent to Shawshank to serve two life sentences, eventually striking a friendship with another inmate, Red Redding (Morgan Freeman). During Dufrense’s stay in prison, he meets the corrupt warden (Bob Gunton), a sadistic prison officer and other inmates who are willing to hurt and rape their fellow just so they’ll be the dominant group inside the prison walls. Despite all of these, Dufrense remains hopeful and even begins doing activities that will spread that hope to his fellow inmates while also gaining the confidence of the warden and other prison officials.

I’d like to say that the movie ended on a happy note. I dunno if it’s an appropriate ending, but who am I to judge. I guess it’s safe to say that it sent the message of hope even in the more tragic events befalling our lives. No wonder it’s on everyone’s movie-to-watch-before-you-die list.

Here are just some of my favorite exchanges from the film:

Parole Man: Ellis Boyd Redding, your files say you've served 40 years of a life sentence. Do you feel you've been rehabilitated?
Red: Rehabilitated? Well, now let me see. You know, I don't have any idea what that means.
Parole Man: Well, it means that you're ready to rejoin society...
Red: I know what *you* think it means, sonny. To me it's just a made up word. A politician's word, so young fellas like yourself can wear a suit and a tie, and have a job. What do you really want to know? Am I sorry for what I did?
Parole Man: Well, are you?
Red: There's not a day goes by I don't feel regret. Not because I'm in here, or because you think I should. I look back on the way I was then: a young, stupid kid who committed that terrible crime. I want to talk to him. I want to try and talk some sense to him, tell him the way things are. But I can't. That kid's long gone and this old man is all that's left. I got to live with that. Rehabilitated? It's just a bullshit word. So you go on and stamp your form, sonny, and stop wasting my time. Because to tell you the truth, I don't give a shit.

Andy: Here's where it makes the most sense. You need it so you don't forget.
Red: Forget?
Andy: Forget that... there are places in this world that aren't made out of stone. That there's something inside... that they can't get to, that they can't touch. That's yours.
Red: What're you talking about?
Andy: Hope.

Andy in a letter to Red: Remember Red, hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies.

There you go. 5 out of 5 too.

ATM Error: Er Rak Error (2012)
Director: Mez Tharatorn
The first two movies were a bit tragic and too taxing, we needed a happy movie before capping off the night. The answer was this Thai movie and I guess it was the right choice.

Jib (Ice - Preechaya Pongthananikorn) and Sua (Ter - Chantavit Dhnasevi) are like any other couple except that they work on the same office that bans fraternization among their employees. They succeed on keeping it discreet until fixing an ATM error becomes the ultimate litmus test for their five-year relationship.

The conflict was simple as well as the story. What made it good were its funny scenes and witty lines—they never failed to elicit laughter in the middle of the night, from us at least. Hahaha! There’s not much to tell except that it’s something you can watch if you’re looking for reason to while the time away.



3.75 out of 5.

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felix felicis: Movie marathon review (long weekend edition)

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Movie marathon review (long weekend edition)

Last Tuesday, I grabbed the chance to slack things off and watch several recommended movies. Here’s a review for all three of them.

Director: Park Chan Wook
I came across this title when I was randomly surfing the net for recommended Asian films. After seeing its review at Rotten Tomatoes and IMDB, I downloaded a copy in advance in case I find a window time to watch it. Work and class suspension last Tuesday gave me enough time to watch this and two other movies.

The plot was simple. Oh Dae-su (Min-sik Choi), a drunkard and a bit of a troublemaker as portrayed in the earlier scenes of the movie, was suddenly detained in a dank and decrepit hotel room for 15 years. During those times, he subsisted on dumplings given by his captors and the company of the room’s television. From there, he learned that he was framed for murdering his wife and daughter and that he was on the run. Bent on getting even, Oh Dae-su spent his time shadow boxing and finding a way to escape his prison. Exactly 15 years after, he was released by his captor telling him to know who he is and why was he detained. The rest of the two-hour movie lays out how Oh Dae-su finds his captor, the reason for his detention and exacting revenge from the people who were accomplices to the harm done on him.

As said, the plot was simple. The plot twists, however, we’re totally bonkers, it’s so awesome. I was used to watching typical Korean romantic movies and dramas but I felt that the lyrical Korean language used perfectly contrasts and sharpens the grit in Park Chan Wook’s opus. The movie was both poetic and sad—it makes one think how our simple stories greatly affect how other people view their lives. One wrong word and it might spell vengeance from those we did wrong. Creepy.

For all its dark and beautiful cinematography, I’m giving it a perfect score. But enough warning is given: the movie shows a generous amount of violence, sex, and gore. If you’re a fan of Hurt Locker- District 9-like films, this might just be next in your line.

5 out of 5.

Director: Frank Darabont
Another recommended movie. The film is set in the 1940s at Shawshank State Prison. Based on a novella written by Stephen King, it tells the story of Andy Dufrense (Tim Robbins), a hotshot banker who was convicted of murdering his wife and his lover despite his pronouncement of innocence. He was then sent to Shawshank to serve two life sentences, eventually striking a friendship with another inmate, Red Redding (Morgan Freeman). During Dufrense’s stay in prison, he meets the corrupt warden (Bob Gunton), a sadistic prison officer and other inmates who are willing to hurt and rape their fellow just so they’ll be the dominant group inside the prison walls. Despite all of these, Dufrense remains hopeful and even begins doing activities that will spread that hope to his fellow inmates while also gaining the confidence of the warden and other prison officials.

I’d like to say that the movie ended on a happy note. I dunno if it’s an appropriate ending, but who am I to judge. I guess it’s safe to say that it sent the message of hope even in the more tragic events befalling our lives. No wonder it’s on everyone’s movie-to-watch-before-you-die list.

Here are just some of my favorite exchanges from the film:

Parole Man: Ellis Boyd Redding, your files say you've served 40 years of a life sentence. Do you feel you've been rehabilitated?
Red: Rehabilitated? Well, now let me see. You know, I don't have any idea what that means.
Parole Man: Well, it means that you're ready to rejoin society...
Red: I know what *you* think it means, sonny. To me it's just a made up word. A politician's word, so young fellas like yourself can wear a suit and a tie, and have a job. What do you really want to know? Am I sorry for what I did?
Parole Man: Well, are you?
Red: There's not a day goes by I don't feel regret. Not because I'm in here, or because you think I should. I look back on the way I was then: a young, stupid kid who committed that terrible crime. I want to talk to him. I want to try and talk some sense to him, tell him the way things are. But I can't. That kid's long gone and this old man is all that's left. I got to live with that. Rehabilitated? It's just a bullshit word. So you go on and stamp your form, sonny, and stop wasting my time. Because to tell you the truth, I don't give a shit.

Andy: Here's where it makes the most sense. You need it so you don't forget.
Red: Forget?
Andy: Forget that... there are places in this world that aren't made out of stone. That there's something inside... that they can't get to, that they can't touch. That's yours.
Red: What're you talking about?
Andy: Hope.

Andy in a letter to Red: Remember Red, hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies.

There you go. 5 out of 5 too.

Director: Mez Tharatorn
The first two movies were a bit tragic and too taxing, we needed a happy movie before capping off the night. The answer was this Thai movie and I guess it was the right choice.

Jib (Ice - Preechaya Pongthananikorn) and Sua (Ter - Chantavit Dhnasevi) are like any other couple except that they work on the same office that bans fraternization among their employees. They succeed on keeping it discreet until fixing an ATM error becomes the ultimate litmus test for their five-year relationship.

The conflict was simple as well as the story. What made it good were its funny scenes and witty lines—they never failed to elicit laughter in the middle of the night, from us at least. Hahaha! There’s not much to tell except that it’s something you can watch if you’re looking for reason to while the time away.



3.75 out of 5.

Labels: , , , , , , , , , ,

1 Comments:

At August 22, 2013 at 10:42 PM , Blogger finyapol said...

grabe bilis! hahahah

 

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