Tramping (trekking + camping) at Manabu

In terms of difficulty, our previous Pinatubo trek proved to be fairly manageable; Manabu in Lipa, Batangas was a notch higher. The fact that I did not have enough exercise made it a bit more difficult. Plus our heavy backpacks. Plus three-liters of water each. Good thing my flesh and my bones did not give up all too easily. We’re planning to do this at least every month. Naks. #GettingFit

A white cross marks the peak of Mount Manabu. Manabu is the short version for Mataas Na Bundok,

Several minutes before we reach the peak, I could already hear my breathing and heartbeat. The only thing that’s pushing all of us to get there is the promise of a beautiful sunset. It did not disappoint. The glowing orange ball dominated the horizon—it was a mix of oranges and yellows, pinks and violets, and greens and dark blues. Before the stars took over, I spent a few minutes sitting at the grass and staring at that far-end of the sky. It was all beautiful and amazing. Back to tent-making.

We relied on our friend’s camping tools so we can eat a decent dinner. It was a feast—there’s newly-cooked rice, hotdogs, tocino and meatloaf. I can honestly say it was one of the best I had. Haha.

The rest of the night was spent stargazing and talking just about anything, amid all the drunken noise and merrymaking made by our fellow campers. We shared our own stories and all those funny memories from our high school days—who’s who, what happened to this and that, where did everyone go? It was only then that I remembered, it was already seven years since I last saw everyone. Three more years before a legit class reunion. Hahaha.

When morning came, the sun was already starting to rise from the east. We made it to the cross—the summit mark, to watch the sun take its place in the sky. Obligatory photos were taken at the summit and then breakfast at our campsite. By eight in the morning, we’re getting ready for our descent.

Four slips until we reached the middle station where freshly brewed Alamid coffee is served for free. Yes, you can drink all you can. Mang Tino, the station guide, is happy to assist and tell stories. If you want more, you can buy the powdered form from 100-500 pesos, depending on the size. More photos and more stories. After almost an hour, we finally went down the mountain. Alas, water and bath! And freshly-made fried lumpia for lunch!


We reached Manila, 6pm, Sunday. I was asleep the whole time. The trek bogged me down. But the fun memories we had made it all worthwhile. We’re gearing for the next climb by the end of June. Excited.

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felix felicis: Tramping (trekking + camping) at Manabu

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Tramping (trekking + camping) at Manabu

In terms of difficulty, our previous Pinatubo trek proved to be fairly manageable; Manabu in Lipa, Batangas was a notch higher. The fact that I did not have enough exercise made it a bit more difficult. Plus our heavy backpacks. Plus three-liters of water each. Good thing my flesh and my bones did not give up all too easily. We’re planning to do this at least every month. Naks. #GettingFit

A white cross marks the peak of Mount Manabu. Manabu is the short version for Mataas Na Bundok,

Several minutes before we reach the peak, I could already hear my breathing and heartbeat. The only thing that’s pushing all of us to get there is the promise of a beautiful sunset. It did not disappoint. The glowing orange ball dominated the horizon—it was a mix of oranges and yellows, pinks and violets, and greens and dark blues. Before the stars took over, I spent a few minutes sitting at the grass and staring at that far-end of the sky. It was all beautiful and amazing. Back to tent-making.

We relied on our friend’s camping tools so we can eat a decent dinner. It was a feast—there’s newly-cooked rice, hotdogs, tocino and meatloaf. I can honestly say it was one of the best I had. Haha.

The rest of the night was spent stargazing and talking just about anything, amid all the drunken noise and merrymaking made by our fellow campers. We shared our own stories and all those funny memories from our high school days—who’s who, what happened to this and that, where did everyone go? It was only then that I remembered, it was already seven years since I last saw everyone. Three more years before a legit class reunion. Hahaha.

When morning came, the sun was already starting to rise from the east. We made it to the cross—the summit mark, to watch the sun take its place in the sky. Obligatory photos were taken at the summit and then breakfast at our campsite. By eight in the morning, we’re getting ready for our descent.

Four slips until we reached the middle station where freshly brewed Alamid coffee is served for free. Yes, you can drink all you can. Mang Tino, the station guide, is happy to assist and tell stories. If you want more, you can buy the powdered form from 100-500 pesos, depending on the size. More photos and more stories. After almost an hour, we finally went down the mountain. Alas, water and bath! And freshly-made fried lumpia for lunch!


We reached Manila, 6pm, Sunday. I was asleep the whole time. The trek bogged me down. But the fun memories we had made it all worthwhile. We’re gearing for the next climb by the end of June. Excited.

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