Wide Open. Again.

The world is our playground. :)
This time, we traversed the streets of Quiapo, Carriedo, Escolta, a bit of Binondo, Delpan then Intramuros. And yes, we were walking the whole time with our cameras lugged at our necks.

We met at Quiapo Church at around two in the afternoon. The sun was still scorching but we went ahead with our shoots, anyway. I did a few shots on churchgoers but I wasn't really happy with the results. We headed towards Escolta Street where the Heritage Weekend is celebrated. There were stalls selling handcrafted stuff and pre-loved items-- there were old vinyls turned into home accessories, old books and magazines for sale, and "waterproof" wallets and pouches. There were also old stamps and coins for enthusiasts. The small celebration was vibrant and colorful. I even managed to sneak a bit of book shopping in the middle of our photowalk. Before we left Escolta, a group of musicians played a few upbeat tunes with their ukeleles. The whole music thing added a more hip vibe to this already nice event.

Ukelele.

Carlos Celdran is at Escolta.
We continued walking towards the more residential areas in Binondo then the slum areas in Delpan. The kids were excited to see cameras; they egged us to take their pictures. They even eagerly posed in front of us. Hahaha. I took a few but I stayed on my supposed subjects, sleeping people. I thought because it was siesta time, it is nice to see sleeping patterns. Hahaha! Anyway, by the time the kids stopped following us, we were already at the Delpan Bridge overlooking Manila's Port Area and the bigger slum communities at Baseco. Sir L asked us if we still want to go to Baseco but no one answered. He took that for a no. Haha. I guess we're still not ready for a more gritty subject. O.o


Previewing "Sleeping Patterns" here.
At five in the afternoon, we entered the walled district of Intramuros. The rest of the walk was tiring but the sights and sounds of Manila were too vivid not to capture in a rectangular frame. I even thought we're walking towards Bocobo in Malate. Nooo. Good thing, we did not. Hahaha!

Our photowalk was capped by visiting the opening of a photo exhibit titled "Uling na, Naging Abo Pa" by photographers Angie de Silva and Pat Roque. They captured the final moments at Sitio Damayan in Tondo (near Smokey Mountain) before the residents were relocated and the place was demolished. The exhibited photos showed nostalgia for a place that served as a livelihood for many residents. Most of the photos actually have that foggy feel-- maybe characterizing the drifting memory of a place that was home to many. We also met the exhibitors but I left early so I did not have the chance to learn more about the photographs. I hope to meet them again.

Also, how can exhibits be soooo costly?! If I want to stage one, I really have to prepare creatively AND financially. Anyway, that's how weekend was. Sleeping Patterns series can be viewed hereThe rest of the photos are uploaded here. Enjoy! :)

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felix felicis: Wide Open. Again.

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Wide Open. Again.

The world is our playground. :)
This time, we traversed the streets of Quiapo, Carriedo, Escolta, a bit of Binondo, Delpan then Intramuros. And yes, we were walking the whole time with our cameras lugged at our necks.

We met at Quiapo Church at around two in the afternoon. The sun was still scorching but we went ahead with our shoots, anyway. I did a few shots on churchgoers but I wasn't really happy with the results. We headed towards Escolta Street where the Heritage Weekend is celebrated. There were stalls selling handcrafted stuff and pre-loved items-- there were old vinyls turned into home accessories, old books and magazines for sale, and "waterproof" wallets and pouches. There were also old stamps and coins for enthusiasts. The small celebration was vibrant and colorful. I even managed to sneak a bit of book shopping in the middle of our photowalk. Before we left Escolta, a group of musicians played a few upbeat tunes with their ukeleles. The whole music thing added a more hip vibe to this already nice event.

Ukelele.

Carlos Celdran is at Escolta.
We continued walking towards the more residential areas in Binondo then the slum areas in Delpan. The kids were excited to see cameras; they egged us to take their pictures. They even eagerly posed in front of us. Hahaha. I took a few but I stayed on my supposed subjects, sleeping people. I thought because it was siesta time, it is nice to see sleeping patterns. Hahaha! Anyway, by the time the kids stopped following us, we were already at the Delpan Bridge overlooking Manila's Port Area and the bigger slum communities at Baseco. Sir L asked us if we still want to go to Baseco but no one answered. He took that for a no. Haha. I guess we're still not ready for a more gritty subject. O.o


Previewing "Sleeping Patterns" here.
At five in the afternoon, we entered the walled district of Intramuros. The rest of the walk was tiring but the sights and sounds of Manila were too vivid not to capture in a rectangular frame. I even thought we're walking towards Bocobo in Malate. Nooo. Good thing, we did not. Hahaha!

Our photowalk was capped by visiting the opening of a photo exhibit titled "Uling na, Naging Abo Pa" by photographers Angie de Silva and Pat Roque. They captured the final moments at Sitio Damayan in Tondo (near Smokey Mountain) before the residents were relocated and the place was demolished. The exhibited photos showed nostalgia for a place that served as a livelihood for many residents. Most of the photos actually have that foggy feel-- maybe characterizing the drifting memory of a place that was home to many. We also met the exhibitors but I left early so I did not have the chance to learn more about the photographs. I hope to meet them again.

Also, how can exhibits be soooo costly?! If I want to stage one, I really have to prepare creatively AND financially. Anyway, that's how weekend was. Sleeping Patterns series can be viewed hereThe rest of the photos are uploaded here. Enjoy! :)

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